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Tony '71
Reply with quote  #46 
To complete the list of Dead End Kids, The photo above has (left to right) Gabriel Dell, Bobby Jordon, Huntz Hall, Leo Gorcey, Bernard Punsley and Billy Halop. That is Pat O'Brien on the stairs and Rocky in the paper was James Cagney. The film, "Angels With Dirty Faces".

In confirming the names I also learned that Leo Gorcey was an addition to the original Broadway cast having taken over the role from another actor named Charles Duncan.



Jim Cassidy '66
Reply with quote  #47 
"Sammy"

Popeye was first hosted by "Captain Allan Swift". His set was designed the ship that was drawn for the opening of the old "Popeye" cartoons

Best
Jim Cassidy
Capt. Allen
Reply with quote  #48 


Captain Allen Swift

Of the three hosts/performers of WPIX Ch. 11 NYC's "Popeye Show", "Captain Allen" Swift remains one of the most popular and engaging in children's TV history.

"Captain Allen" was every NYC kid's favorite grandfather who went away to sea and came back a successful skipper with a lot of fun and stories to tell.

Set against the backdrop of the deck and captain's quarters of a ship, Swift would engage his viewers (his Mateys) in stories, drawing lessons, magic tricks, songs, craftmaking, hobbies and interviews with guest performers and personalities between the reruns of "Popeye" movie cartoons. He would also encourage good values in his viewers - as "Captain Allen" warned the kids at home not to try and emulate "Popeye's" strongman stunts or to believe in the stereotyping of ethnic groups as they were depicted in the "Popeye" movie cartoons.

During the show's first few weeks on the air, "Captain Allen" engaged his viewers in a "Popeye" drawing contest. According to several newspaper accounts, he received 157,000 entries by mail. The winner of the contest, who won a treasure chest full of toys and a pony, was a boy from Nyack, New York.

Captain Allen's Popeye Show was even nominated for a NYC Emmy award in 1957 for Best Children's Show. "The Popeye Show" lost out to WCBS TV's "On The Carousel" with Paul Tripp. Nevertheless, "The Popeye Show" remained a success with NYC Kids. Swift even did personal appearances with one of the actors who did Popeye's voice for the Paramount/Famous movie cartoons, Mr. Harry Foster Welch at Macy's and Bamberger's Dept. Stores.

The public appearances by Captain Allen and Mr. Welch broke all attendance records at both stores. Unfortunately, the station execs at WPIX did not like the idea of Swift philosophizing in between the films on the show. To the station execs at Ch. 11, "Captain Allen" and the other kid show hosts were little more than promoters of the show's sponsors, there to do that and introduce the films. They began to try and censor Swift's disclaimers about the violence and racism in the cartoons. Swift fought against the interference from station management but the fight was difficult to say the least.

"Captain Allen" hosted Ch. 11's "Popeye Show" from Monday September 10, 1956 until his TV voyage ended on Friday, September 23, 1960. There are those of us who were lucky to be entertained, informed and inspired by "Captain Allen" Swift - we all enjoyed his five year voyage as the 'Popeye Show's first sea captain performer.
Russell Doucette '73
Reply with quote  #49 
How many "batches" of Popeye cartoons were there? There were at least the original Fletchers, Parmount, The Famous Artists or Studios and the Popeye and Son cartoons. I'm sure I missed something.
Jim
Reply with quote  #50 


Trivia Question:

What do actors Leo Gorcey, Peter Falk, and Eddie "Rochester"
Anderson have in common??

Jim "Sammy" Davis,67

PS: to Jack Cassidy: Right you are!! It was Allan Swift!!
Bruce Lipkin '67
Reply with quote  #51 
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Sammy!
Jim
Reply with quote  #52 


You got it Bruce,

Gorcey, Falk and Anderson played the three taxi drivers
in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World!!"

Jim "Sammy" Davis,67
Pat Trainor SM'67
Reply with quote  #53 
Hi Everyone,

I remember#5 Hambone sayings like "Cut your grass so the bugs can pass," but I always thought it was Soupy Sales. I guess I have forgotten who the personality was behind the character.
I always liked Sandy Becker anyway, in fact, when I was 5 I told my mother I wanted to marry him. Well talk to u later
Pat T
Tony71

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Reply with quote  #54 
Zacherley
I was going through my year's worth of unfiled papers today in preparation for tax filing when I came upon this photo.


Back in 1996, while I was living in New Jersey, I read that there was going to be "Chiller Theatre" show at Fairleigh Dickenson that was going to feature a guest appearance by Zacherley. He was my favorite kid's tv host back in the early sixties. One of my earliest memories was of him breaking into the middle of "Mighty Joe Young", during the burning orphanage scene, wearing a fire helmet and dragging a trickling hose calling, "I'll help you Joe, I'll help you. .."

Not wanting to miss the opportunity to meet my childhood hero, my daughter and I headed to Hackensack and I got the above autographed photo ("To Tony and Jessie from Zacherley and the Mighty Joe Young") and got to thank him personally.

You can view his web site by clicking here.


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kevibob

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Reply with quote  #55 
I'm replying to Bob Johnstone's comment about James Hall being the Satchmos nephew.  I believe  the MC student was Jerome Hall or Jerry Hall MC71  I remember we were in gym class  and he looked a lot like his uncle and used to imitate him.  He lived in Woodside and he never made a big deal out of it but I was impressed.  I also rememberChuck McCann came to the Loew's theatre  on Stienway St. one Saturday Afternoon and did a big show I was sitting close to the front and remember how awful the show was it was very Catskill Shtick kind stuff way over most kids heads but everybody was screaming and yelling anyway.  Remember Bonamo's Turkish Taffy?  I still fantasize about that stuff.  We used to buy it at Cort and Riggers on the corner of Bdwy and 35st.  I also remember the Chicken Store on Broadway by MPB where you could buy live chickens.........
Tony71

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Reply with quote  #56 
Sorry, couldn't find any Bonomo's Turkish Taffy anywhere but the Vermont Country Store site has "French Taffy" (or should we call it "Freedom Taffy?).

This is a smooth nougaty chew with a dusting of powdered sugar. Refrigerate it so it cools and then smack it on the counter - it will break into smaller pieces. This is the closest you will find to the now non-existent Bonomo's Turkish Taffy. There is only one gram of fat in a bar. The banana flavor comes in a different wrapper than the other three flavors. Sold in a pack of 12 of one flavor or as a variety pack with 3 of each flavor.


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patarabajianpanico

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Reply with quote  #57 

I remember the chicken place on Broadway.  Live chickens - it was always an amazing place to me.  And there was a 5 & 10 next to it I think.  Across the street was an electric place - big windows.  Yeah, I remember the chicken place.  I used to live on 37th Street off Broadway, closer to the next avenue.  And there was an ice cream parlor near there - before the L.  Boy, talk about a trip back in time...

kevibob

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Reply with quote  #58 


      TONY:  i just ordered some turkish taffy I ordered 12 vanilla bars to give to my family   thanks so much  
                                          KEVIN 
Tony71

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Reply with quote  #59 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevibob


      TONY:  i just ordered some turkish taffy I ordered 12 vanilla bars to give to my family   thanks so much  
                                          KEVIN 


Let me know if it really does taste like Turkish Taffy. That was one of my favorite flavor items as a kid. Heavy, sweet vanilla taste. Half the fun was slamming the bar on a hard surface to break it up.

I even remember the jingle:

"B - O
N - O
M - O
Oh, Oh, Oh. . .it's Bonomo. . .Turkish Taffy"

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kevibob

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Reply with quote  #60 

Does anyone remember any other candy that's not around anymore.  I remember those real dark heavy licorice candy pipes.  We used to call them lepruchan pipes they were really sticky but very good.  BTW I'm starting to remember you Tony.  I can remember you were the first one of our age group to push the envelope hair wise.  You were in hot water once or twice about it touching your collar and ears.  I kinda remember you were also the first kid to stop wearing those horn rimmed glasses, you had the first pair of wire rimmed glasses I ever saw on a teenager.  My group used to call the horned rimmed glasses birth control glasses  because no girls would even look at you wearing those ugly plastic frame glasses  LOL  I couldn't see without mine so I had to wear them.

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